Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

M

main pot: In poker, that portion of the pot that is not on the side when there is a side pot.

matched pairs: Rankings 2 through 12 of pai gow tiles combinations.

matching pairs: The 22 tiles in pai gow tiles that duplicate each other, that is, of which there are 11 pairs.

money covers: See bank covers.

money does not cover: See bank does not cover.

muck: Discards.

N

nobody home: A term used in California games to describe a position on the table that has no bets on it.

no-bust blackjack: A description of 21st Century Blackjack, a variant of blackjack in which players cannot bust and have a possibility of not losing their bets even if their hand total exceeds 21.

no limit: The betting in a no-limit game. Compare with limit, pot limit, and spread limit.

no-limit game: A game in which the maximum bet that can be made at any time is equal the size of your stack (or the other player’s).

nominal dealer position: The seat in a poker game that represents the position of the dealer if the game were not being dealt by a house dealer. This position is the last to receive cards when the house dealer distributes cards in any round.

no pair: 1. The hand that ranks below one pair and is sometimes known as high card. Examples: A♠ K♠ 7♣ 9♦ 2♥, 7♥ 5♣ 4♣ 3♦ 2♠. Between two hands having no pair, the one with the higher card wins at the showdown. If the top cards are the same, the next card is compared, and so on. Thus, A♣ K♠ T♠ 9♣ 8♦ beats A♠ K♣ T♥ 9♦ 7♠. 2. In three-card poker, three cards of different ranks and different suits Example: 10♦ 8♠ 7♣.

nuts: An unbeatable hand. Also called cinch, lock.

O

Omaha: The short name at Bay 101 Casino for Omaha high-low split.

Omaha 8-or-better: Another name for Omaha high-low split.

Omaha high-low split: A poker game in which players start with four hole cards, followed by a round of betting (preflop), three community cards called the flop are dealt to the center of the table, followed by another round of betting, another community card called the turn is dealt to the center of the table, followed by another round of betting, and a final community card called the river is dealt to the center of the table, followed by a final round of betting. At this point either: a showdown occurs, and either the best remaining high hand, formed by players using the best five-card combination from exactly two of their hole cards plus three of the community cards, splits the pot with the best remaining low hand, similarly formed but possibly using a different five cards, which five cards must be 8 or lower; or the only remaining hand wins the pot by default. The name of this game is sometimes shortened to simply Omaha. The game is also frequently called Omaha 8-or-better.

on the board: Pertaining to the community cards in hold’em or Omaha

one pair: 1. The poker hand that consists of two cards of one rank, plus three unrelated cards (called side cards or kickers). Example: K♣ K♥ A♥ 7♣ 2♣. Ranks between no pair and two pair. 2. In three-card poker, the hand that consists of two cards of one rank, plus one unrelated card. Example: 7♥ 7♣ 4♥.

open the pot: In poker, be the first player on the first round of betting to make a call, or come in for a raise.

option: If all players have limped (that is, no one has raised) on the first round of betting in hold’em or Omaha, the big blind can stop the betting for that round (by not increasing the bet); if the big blind raises, the betting continues. This is sometime indicated by the house dealer saying to the big blind, “You have the option.” If the big blind does not wish to raise, the player sometimes indicates this by tapping on the table.

outs: In hold’em or Omaha, the number of cards remaining in the deck that can complete a winning hand. For example, if you have 9♥ 10♥ and the board consists of 2♣ 3♦ 7♠ 8♥, you have eight outs (any jack or six will complete a straight).

overcard: In hold’em or Omaha, a card in a player’s hand higher than any of the cards on the board or a card in a player’s hand or on the board higher than a pocket pair held by a player.

P

pai gow: A shorter name for either pai gow poker or Pai gow tiles.

pai gow poker: A California games in which players receive seven cards, which are set into two hands, one of five cards and one of two, which compete against the player-dealer’s two hands.

pai gow tiles: A California games in which players receive four dominoes (tiles), which are set into two hands, each consisting of two tiles, which compete against the player-dealer’s two hands. The name of this game is sometimes shortened to tiles.

piles: 1. pai gow poker hands, each consisting of seven cards, as dealt out by the house dealer before they are distributed to seated players. 2. Pai gow tiles hands, each consisting of four tiles, as dealt out by the house dealer before they are distributed to seated players.

player-dealer: The player who banks any of the California games and against whom the other players compete one at a time. Sometimes called designated player.

plays for: See blind.

play the board: In hold’em or Omaha, use all five community cards as one’s best five-card hand. (That is, specifically not be able to use either or both of one’s starting cards as part of one’s best five-card hand.) If multiple players play the board and no one can produce a better hand than what appears on the board, that results in a split pot.

play through the blinds: Deal off.

play to the blind: In poker, play each hand of the blind cycle until the big blind is one position to the right and then leave the table or change seats. Compare with deal off.

pocket: The first two cards in hold’em or Omaha, that is a player’s private cards (as opposed to the community cards). Aces in the pocket (also known as pocket rockets) means a player’s hole cards in hold’em were both aces.

poker games: The forms of poker played at Casino Bay 101 Casino: hold’em and Omaha high-low split.

poker hands: See rank of hands.

poker floor: Another name for the poker section.

poker section: That part of the cardroom in which the poker games are played.

position: Where a player sits in reference to the house dealer. Position and seat number are often synonymous.

pot: In a poker game, the accumulation in the center of the table of chips that players have bet up to and including the final bet.

pot limit: The betting in a pot-limit game. Compare with limit, no limit, and spread limit.

pot-limit game: A game in which the maximum bet or raise that can be made at any time is equal the size of the pot.

preflop: The first round in hold’em or Omaha, that is, the round of betting (or the cards) before the flop.

push: 1. The situation in which two poker hands are the same, and the pot is split. 2. The situation in California games in which player hand and player-dealer hand copy (are the same) and no money changes hands.

Q

qualifier: See 8-or-better.

qualify: 1. In 8-or-better to be eligible for the low half of the pot a hand must qualify, that is, consist of five cards 8 or lower, none of which is duplicated. (Straights and flushes do not count against a low hand.) 2. In three-card poker, have in the player-dealer hand at least some minimum holding, usually queen high. The player-dealer hand must qualify for certain bets to be paid.

R

rabbit hunting: In poker, asking to see the top card in the deck (that is, the next card that would be dealt after a hand is over) so as to determine what you would have made had you not folded. Such behavior is generally not permitted and always frowned upon.

rag: Blank.

rags: In hold’em, small cards in a player’s starting hand or among the community cards (where they are often known as blanks).

rail: A barrier separating the games from the onlookers and those waiting to be seated; so called because the barrier often is an actual wooden railing. By extension, the rail means the area from which onlookers watch games, or, often, the onlookers themselves.

railbird: Someone who hangs out on the rail, often implying someone too broke to get into a game, or someone who just busted out of a game or tournament. Sometimes railbird is a synonym for kibitzer.

raise: (verb) 1. In poker, increase a bet, that is, put into the pot an amount equal to the previous bet along with extra chips. “I raise.” “I raise $100.” — (noun) 2. The increase of a bet. “There’s a raise in this pot.”

rake: Drop.

rank: In a deck of playing cards, the value of any one card, from low to high in the following: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, jack, queen, king, ace.

rank of hands: The hierarchy of the hands of poker, listed here from best to worst:

Hand Example
Royal Flush A♠ K♠ Q♠ J♠ 10♠
Straight Flush J 10 9 8 7 5♠ 4♠ 3♠ 2♠ A♠
Four of a Kind 9♣ 9♠ 9 9 A♣
Full House 9♣ 9♠ 9 A♣ A
Flush A♥ 10♥ 7♥ 4♥ 2♥
Straight J 10♠ 9♥ 8♣ 7♥
Three of a Kind 9♣ 9♠ 9 A♣ Q
Two Pair A A♣ K♣ K Q♣
One Pair K♣ K A 7♣ 2♣
No Pair A♠ K♠ 7♣ 9 2

read: (verb) 1. Attempt to make a conclusion about another player’s holdings based on that player’s actions, remarks, betting patterns, the composition of the board, etc. 2. At the showdown, call the contents of a hand at the showdown.. This is usually done by the house dealer and can help players ascertain what their holdings are, often a necessary service particularly in Omaha.

river: The fifth and final community cards in hold’em or Omaha.

royal flush: 1. In poker, an ace-high straight flush, that is, five cards in sequence topped by an ace and of the same suit. This is the highest hand in any poker game at Bay 101 Casino. Example: A♠ K♠ Q♠ J♠ 10♠. 2. In three-card poker, three cards in sequence topped by an ace and of the same suit. Example: A♥ K♥ Q♥.

runner-runner: See backdoor.

S

sandbag: Check-raise with a good hand.

satellite tournament: A special tournament whose prize is usually a buy-in to a larger tournament. Often shortened simply to satellite.

satellite: Satellite tournament.

scoop: Win both high and low in Omaha high-low split.

scoop game: A game featuring scoop pot. At Bay 101 Casino, that game is Omaha high-low split.

scooped pot: Scoop pot.

scoop pot: A hand in which the same player wins both high and low in Omaha high-low split. For the next pot to qualify as a kill pot, a player must win at least 10 strange bets in the scoop pot. Also called scooped pot.

seat: Seat number.

seat number: Where a player sits at the table with reference to the house dealer. Seat number and position are often synonymous. Often shortened to seat.

set: (verb) 1. In pai gow poker, arrange one’s initial seven cards into two hands, a five-card back handand a two-card front hand. 2. In pai gow tiles, arrange one’s initial four tiles into two hands of two tiles each, a high hand and a low hand. — 3. (noun) In poker games, the poker hand three of a kind, usually specifically referring to a pair combined with a matching card on the board.

set over set: In hold’em, one player’s set against another’s. If you start with a pair of nines and I have a pair of sevens, and the board comes 9-7-2-3-8, that is a situation of set over set.

setting the hand: See set (definition 1 or 2).

shoe: A device that holds one or more decks of playing cards such that they can be slid out face down one at a time by a dealer without their front sides being visible. A shoe makes it easy to deal games like 21st Century Blackjack and 21st Century Baccarat from multiple decks of cards. Also known as dealing shoe.

short buy-in: Any amount less than a full buy-in. Under some circumstances, a short buy-in is permitted when your chips get low.

showdown: The point in a poker game at which all bets have been equalized and players display their cards to determine who has the best hand.

show one, show all: If you show your cards privately to one player during or after the play of a hand, any other player can request to see the hand, even if those cards would not otherwise constitute a called hand. Showing your cards to one player and not the others, or to half the table and not the rest, is considered bad form and at Bay 101 Casino is against the rules.

side bet: 1. An optional bet in a California games, such as the tie bet in 21st Century Baccarat. 2. A proposition bet, such as on the outcome of a hand made by nonparticipants in a pot, made without knowledge of or sanction by the house.

side card: See kicker.

side pot: In poker, if a player runs out of chips during the play of a hand, that player is considered all in and is no longer required to put any chips into the pot. Any further betting among remaining players goes into a side pot, of which an all-in player can win no portion. An all-in player can win from any other player only an amount equal to what he has put into the pot, no more. If there is a side pot at the end of a hand and only one other player remains in contention for the side pot, that player’s hand must be shown even though no one has called that player’s last bet. This is to determine who wins the main pot.

small blind: The smaller of the two blinds, put into a pot by the player to the left of the button. The small blind is half the size of the big blind. For example, in a $10-$20 game, the small blind is $5.

soft ace: In 21st Century Blackjack, counting an ace as 11, such as in soft 17.

soft hand: In 21st Century Blackjack, a hand in which an ace is given a value of 11, as opposed to a hard hand. Examples: A♠ 9♥ 2♠ 3♦ A♣ 5♦.

soft 17: In 21st Century Blackjack, a hand that totals 17 when the ace is counted as 11. Examples: A♥ 6♠ A♦ 4♠ 2♥.

speak: See cards speak.

splash the pot: Throw chips messily into the pot, with the risk of mixing them with chips already there, as opposed to stacking them neatly at the perimeter of the pot. Splashing the pot is frowned on in most cardrooms (and considered poor poker etiquette), because it is hard for the house dealer — and other players — to determine exactly how much the player has bet.

split: In 21st Century Blackjack, when a player has two cards of the same rank, ace through 9, a player has the option of doubling the initial wager, forming two new hands, and playing each as a new hand (standing or hitting, as desired). (Aces receive only one card when split.) For the purpose of splitting, any two 10-count cards are considered to be of the same rank. For example, all of the following can be split: A♠ A♦ 9♠ 9♥ J♠ J♣ 10♠ K♥.

split pot: 1. In poker, the situation in which, at the showdown, two or more identical hands are shown. This results in the pot being divided equally among the holders of those hands. 2. In Omaha, the situation in which, at the showdown, one player has a winner for high and one player has a winner for low. The pot is divided equally between the holder of the best high hand and the best low hand.

spread limit: In poker, a betting structure within a range. Every round, any bet or raise may be at the bottom of that range, at the top, or anywhere between. For example, in a $10-$200 game, a bet or raise may be $10, $20, $30, $50, and so on, up to $200. A raise must be at least as large as the previous bet or raise. Thus, a bet of $50 may be raised by $50 or more. Anything less would not be permitted, so a bet of $50 could not be raised by $40; it can be raised by any amount from $50 to $200. The total bet may exceed $200, but the maximum amount for any bet or the amount by which that bet is raised is $200. Spread limit is like no limit, except that no individual bet or raise can exceed $200. Compare with limit betting.

stack: 1. All of your chips, with reference to a bet in a big-bet game. “I’ll bet my stack.” 2. The totality of one’s chips, particularly in a tournament. “I had the short stack at the table.” 3. One pile of chips, usually 20 high.

stand: In 21st Century Blackjack or 21st Century Baccarat, not draw cards to a hand. The opposite of hit.

straddle: In poker, an optional blind wager normally twice the size of the established big blind. A straddle can be made only by the player to the immediate left of the big blind. It is live and considered a raise.

straight: 1. In poker, five cards in sequence of different suits. Ranks above two pair and below a straight. Example: J♦ 10♠ 9♥ 8♣ 7♥. 2. In three-card poker, three cards in sequence of different suits. Example: 8♥ 7♣ 6♥. In both games, between two straights, the one topped by the higher card beats the other. For example, J♦ 10♠ 9♥ 8♣ 7♥ beats 6♣ 5♠ 4♦ 3♠ 2♥.

straight flush: 1. In poker, five cards in sequence of the same suit. This hand ranks higher than four of a kind. Example: J♥ 10♥ 9♥ 8♥ 7♥. A straight flush topped by an ace is given the special name royal flush.. 2. In three-card poker, three cards in sequence of the same suit. Example: 8♥ 7♥ 6♥. In both games, between two straight flushes, the one topped by the higher card beats the other. For example, J♦ 10♦ 9♦ 8♦ 7♦ beats 6♠ 5♠ 4♠ 3♠ 2♠

strange bets: Bets other than those the player puts in, that is, bets that the player clearly wins, as opposed to the actual size of the pot.

string bet: An illegal bet, because it was not made all in one motion. The concept of string bets is complicated. If you want to raise a bet, you are supposed to have as many chips in your hand as you need to cover the bet you are raising plus sufficient chips to include your raise when you put your hand in the pot, and then release all of them before withdrawing your hand. Similarly, if you wish to bet more than the minimum in a no-limit game, you are supposed to have as many chips as you wish to bet in your hand. The rules permit you to say, “I raise” (or something that means the same, even something as nebulous as “Going up!”) or, in the case of a bet, “I bet” (or something interpretable as synonymous), and then make one or more trips back to your stack for more chips. In the absence of the preceding conditions, you are likely to be guilty of making a string bet, the penalty for which is being permitted only to call the preceding bet, or put in the pot only as many chips as you currently have in your hand (or, in the case of a bet in a no-limit game, bet only the minimum for the game). Watch out! The string bet situation trips up more players than almost any other rule. The rationale behind prohibiting string bets is that, in former times, a player might put in part of his bet, hesitate long enough to see the reactions of other players, and then, based on those reactions, perhaps increase the bet.

structured limit: See limit betting.

stub: The cards remaining in a deck during or at the end of a hand.

suit: One of the four groups of 13 cards into which a deck of playing cards is divided: spades (♠), hearts (♥), diamonds (♦), clubs (♣).

suited: In poker, pertaining to two or more cards in the same suit. In hold’em, usually descriptive of the first two cards being of the same suit, as opposed to offsuit. Sometimes the term applies to more than two cards, as, for example, three or more suited cards can appear among the community cards in hold’em or Omaha.

Supreme Pair: Gee Joon, the highest-ranking pai gow tiles combination, 2-4 with 1-2.

surrender: In poker, give up a pot without hands being shown.

sweat: Watch the action, usually from the rail, at a gaming table without being involved in it. Similar to kibitz, without the negative connotations.

T

table: At the showdown in poker, turn a hand face up and lay it flat on the poker table so the dealer and all players have an opportunity to identify the hand.

table stakes: In poker games, the requirement that players can wager in any one hand only the money in front of them at the start of the hand, and can put more money on the table or buy more chips only between hands and cannot remove money or chips from the table unless leaving the game.

Texas hold’em: The “official” name of hold’em.

three-card poker: A California games in which players try to beat the player-dealer with their three-card hands and, optionally, get paid off for certain poker-like combinations if they make a bonus bet. Players make an ante bet. After seeing their cards, if they wish to continue, they make a play bet equal in size to the ante bet. Hands then compete, one at a time, as in a Nevada blackjack game, against the player-dealer hand (if it qualifies).

three of a kind: 1. A poker hand, three cards of the same rank, plus two other unrelated cards. Example: 9♣ 9♠ 9♦ A♣ Q♥. Ranks above two pair and below a straight. 2. In three-card poker, three cards of the same rank. Example: 8♥ 8♣ 8♦.

tie bet: An optional bet (side bet), placed before cards are dealt in 21st Century Baccarat, that player hand and player-dealer hand will tie.

tiles: 1. The dominoes used in pai gow tiles. 2. A shortened name for pai gow tiles.

top pair: The situation in hold’em in which a player pairs one of his hole cards with the highest card on the board. For example, if you have Q♥ 8♥, and the flop is Q♣ T♦ 7♣, you have flopped top pair. (If you have Q♥ A♥, you have flopped top pair, top kicker.)

trey: A 3 (the card).

top pair, top kicker: See top pair.

turn: The fourth community cards in hold’em or Omaha.

21st Century Baccarat: A California games in which two two-card hands are dealt, a player hand and a banker hand,. Players bet on either one. Each hand may optionally draw one card, the aim being to get as close as possible to a total of 9.

21st Century Blackjack: A California games in which players receive two cards and try to get as close as they can to a total of 21, optionally hit the hand, and compete against the player-dealer’s hand.

two pair: The poker hand that consists of two of one rank, plus two of another rank, plus an unrelated card. Example: A♥ A♣ K♣ K♥ Q♣. Ranks between one pair and three of a kind.

U

unmatched pairs: Tiles in pai gow tiles that are different, but whose pip total (9, 8, 7, or 5) on each is the same.

unmatching pairs: The 10 tiles in pai gow tiles that do not duplicate each other, that is, of which there are five sets.

under the gun: The position to the left of the big blind, that is, in hold’em or Omaha, the player (or position) who acts first on the first round of betting.

V

W

wager: (noun) 1. A bet. (verb) 2. Make a bet.

waiting list board: A list of customers waiting to be seated in a poker game. Often shortened to board.

wild tiles: In pai gow tiles, two tiles are considered wild, the two that make up Gee Joon. One totals 6 and the other 3, but either can be switched. For example, if you have a hand of 6 + 4, that would be reckoned as 0. You can call the 6 a 3, which then totals 7, for a better hand.

window: Cashier’s cage.

Wong: In pai gow tiles, a 12 or a 2 tile with any 9.

X

Y

Z

 

A

action: 1. In 21st Century Blackjack, how much of a player’s original bet he wishes to be involved if the controlling bettor elects to increase the bet. For example, if a player bets $50 and a backline bettor bets $100, the backline bettor decides whether to split or double down. The $50 bettor may elect not to increase his own bet. Thus, he gets action only on $50. 2. In all games, being required to do something (bet, raise, play one’s hand, etc.). When it’s your turn , someone might say, “It’s your action,” or, “The action is up to you.” 3. In poker games, how much of a pot a player particular player is liable for, usually when that player is all in. For example, if two players have bet $20 each and a third player runs out of chips after the first $10, that player gets action on only that $10. That is, he can win only $10 from each of the other two. He also can lose only that $10, because all games are played for table stakes.

act: Make a poker play at the required time; that is, bet, call, raise, or fold, as appropriate, in turn.

action: 1. Making a poker play at the required time; that is, betting, calling, raising, or folding, as appropriate, in turn. 2. In California games, where the settling of bets begins, as indicated by the action button.

action button: In California games, a disk placed in front of the player with whose hand first the player-dealer first settles.

action hand: The hand that plays first against the player-dealer, as indicated by the action button.

active player: 1. In poker, a player still in contention for a pot, that is, one who has not folded. 2. In California games, the player with the largest bet at a specific position, who controls how to play the hand (whether to hit or stand in 21st Century Blackjack or 21st Century Baccarat, how to set the hand in pai gow poker or pai gow tiles, etc.).

all in: In poker games, having run out of chips before a pot is completed.

all-in: Describing being all in, such as an all-in bet or an all-in player.

active player: In poker games, a player who still has an interest in a pot; that is, a player who has not folded.

ante: In poker, chips that a player puts into the pot before a hand is dealt in addition to the blinds. (In games like seven-card stud, antes are used instead of blinds.) Unlike the blinds, antes do not “play for” the player. At Casino Bay 101 Casino, antes come into play only in tournaments, and only after several rounds of play.

ante bet: The mandatory first bet that players in three-card poker make before receiving their cards.

B

backdoor: In hold’em or Omaha, catch two cards in a row on the turn and river to make a straight or flush when a player had only three cards to the hand on the flop; always followed by the name of the hand caught. The term often applies to a hand made on the end that the player of the hand wasn’t trying to make, implying that the player had something else to go for on three cards than the straight or flush. For example, a player starts with A♥ 8♥, and the flop is A♠ 6♦ 4♥. The turn is 9♥, and the river J♥, causing the player to backdoor a flush. Sometimes the term refers to making four of a kind when a player had a pair in the hole (and nothing else on the flop). The two cards caught or the situation of catching them is often called runner-runner.

back hand: In pai gow poker, the five-card hand, placed behind the front hand after the player has set his hand, and which must rank higher than the front hand.

backline betting: The situation in which a player bets on a hand and is not seated at that location at the table.

backliner: Backline bettor.

backline bettor: A player who bets on a hand but is not seated at that location at the table.

bank: The money put up by the player-dealer in any of the California games, from which the competing players are paid (and to which they pay if they lose a hand).

bank covers: In California games the player-dealer bank is sufficient to pay off all bets. Also, money covers.

banker: player-dealer, that is, the player who puts up the bank in any of the California games.

bank does not cover: The order in which hands in California games compete against the player-dealer is important, because if the player-dealer loses his stake prematurely (that is, the bank has had full action), not all player hands may get to compete. Also, money does not cover.

bet: (noun) 1. In poker, any individual wager. In a limit game, you might hear, “It costs you one bet to get in.” “The betting is capped at four bets.” 2. In poker, the total amount that a player must call at any given point during the play of a hand. “What is the bet to me?” “It will cost you $100 to get into this pot.” 3. In California games, the wager a player makes before distribution of the cards or tiles. — (verb) 4. In any of the preceding, make such a wager. “I bet $200.”

betting circle: Where a Backline bettor puts his bet.

betting square: 1. In California games, the marked area on the table layout where a player puts his wager.

big-bet game: A pot-limit, spread limit, or no-limit game, as opposed to a limit game.

big blind: The larger of the two blinds, put into a pot by the player two positions to the left of the button. The big blind is equal in size to the smaller limit for the game. For example, in a $10-$20 game, the big blind is $10.

big slick: In hold’em, ace-king as starting cards.

blind: One of two bets put into a pot before the cards are dealt for a hand, the small blind and the big blind. The chips that constitute the blind are part of the player’s next bet if the player elects to continue in the hand. They are forfeited (remain in the pot) if the player folds. If the player plays the hand, the chips “play for” the player. That is, they are considered part of the player’s bet. For example, in a $10-$20 game, the big blind is $10. If the betting has reached $40 when it is the big blind’s turn to act, and he decides to play, he need add only another $30 to the pot, because he already has $10 in the pot.

blank: A card of no value to a hand; a small unlikely helpful card. The term is usually used in Omaha and hold’em. For example, in hold’em, with a flop of A♥ J♠ T♥, a turn card of 3♣ would be considered a blank. The 2♥ or Q♦ would not be. Also, brick, rag.

bluff: In poker, make a bet that no one calls and thus win the pot by default, or bet with a hand that cannot otherwise win and lose the pot when someone calls.

Bo: Matched pairs in pai gow tiles (rankings 2 through 12).

board: 1. In hold’em and Omaha, the community cards. 2. Waiting list board.

board cards: The community cards that constitute the board.

board person: The employee who writes the names on the waiting list board of customers waiting to be seated in a poker game.

bonus bet: An optional side bet in three-card poker for players who place an ante bet. Payoffs for the three-card hands range in size from even (1:1) for one pair to 200:1 for a royal flush.

boxed card: A card found face up within the deck during a deal. A boxed card can be ruled to be a dead card.

brick: Blank.

burn: Take a card out of play by placing the card face down among the discards. This is usually done in poker games and California games played with cards prior to the dealing of a round of cards.

burn card: The card taken out of play as described under burn.

button: 1. In hold’em and Omaha, a disk that indicates the nominal dealer position. When the house dealer distributes cards, the player to the left of the button receives the first cards. 2. In California games, the action button or dealer button.

Buster Bet: A 21st Century Blackjack side bet that pays if the player banker total exceeds 21, with payout depending on how many cards the player-dealer busts with, ranging from 2:1 for three cards to 200:1 for eight or more.

buy-in: The minimum amount required to get into a game. You must make a full buy-in when you first sit down at a table. Under some circumstances, you may make a short buy-in later on.

cage: Cashier’s cage.

C

California game: Any of several games in which players compete against a player-dealer, who banks the game. The games are 21st Century Blackjack, 21st Century Baccarat, pai gow poker, pai gow tiles, and three-card poker.

California games floor: Another name for the California games section.

California games section: That part of the cardroom in which the California games are played.

call: 1. In poker, meet a previous bet or raise, that is, neither raise nor folds. 2. Open a pot (be the first to bet on the first round) for the minimum bet. Players often call this limping.

called hand: In poker, a hand that someone bet and someone else called, as opposed to a hand that was bet and no one called. The term often comes up when a bet is made, called, and lost, and the bettor who lost the hand now wants to throw the cards away unshown (perhaps from embarrassment at being caught bluffing). Someone, often someone not involved in the hand, wants to see the losing cards, and cites the rule, “A called hand must be shown upon request.” (Some players, particularly those most used to private games, are under the mistaken impression that only the winner of a pot has the right to ask for a called hand to be shown.) The situation can also arise when someone bets, someone calls, and the bettor discards his cards as acknowledgment that he was bluffing, and the caller undoubtedly had him beat. The winner of the hand often shows his cards, but not always, particularly in a fast-moving game. The hand that won the pot is still, however, a called hand, and must be shown if anyone asks. When a side pot is involved, usually all active hands at the showdown are called hands.

call the blind: Put into the pot an amount equal to the size of the big blind. This is also called limping.

cap: One bet and three raises are permitted in any poker round. When that fourth bet has been made, the pot is capped. (If only two players remain in a pot, there is no cap.) That last bet is known as the cap.

cards speak: If a hand is turned over (tabled) for the house dealer to verify, then the cards read for themselves (that is, have the value of what is shown). Even if the dealer miscalls the hand, it plays at its true value. Any player at the table has an obligation to properly read a hand if the house dealer makes a mistake.

cards speak for themselves: The complete rendering of cards speak.

cashier: Cashier’s cage.

cashier’s cage: The room or area, often behind a glass or behind bars (hence the name), within which the cashier buys and sells chips and conducts financial transactions. Also, cashier, window, or simply cage.

check: (verb) 1. Choose not to make a bet, but to retain the right to hold your hand until there has been a bet. (noun) 2. Another name for chip.

check-raise: First check and then raise when the action gets back to you if someone bets. Sometimes called sandbag, although that term implies holding a good hand; check-raising can be done with a good hand or as a bluff.

chip: Disk-shaped token, usually about the size of a silver dollar and made of clay, paper composite, or plastic, and sometimes metal, and of various colors, used to represent various monetary betting units; such as a $1 chip, or a $5 chip. Chips are used in place of cash in all Bay 101 Casino games. Also called check.

collection: A nominal amount that is taken per hand from each participant in California games. Called drop in poker games.

cinch: Nuts.

combinations: In pai gow tiles, those hands not accounted for in higher rankings and whose rankings are calculated by taking the two tile totals, and using only the last digit. For example, 8 +7 = 15, which is reckoned as 5.

come in for a raise: In poker, be the first player on the first round of betting to make a bet and do so by raising (as opposed to calling or limping)

community cards: In hold’em and Omaha, the five cards dealt to the center of the table following the preflop round of betting. These are called the board. They become part of each active player’s hand. The cards are dealt three at once to constitute the flop, one more for the turn, and one final card for the river.

connectors: In hold’em, two cards in sequence, usually with reference to hole cards, as, for example, 8♠ 9♦.

copy: In California games, in which player hand and player-dealer hand are identical.

racked: Having had a hand (usually a very good one) beaten.

cut: In poker, separate the deck into two sections, after the cards have been shuffled, after which the former bottom half is placed atop the former top half, and then the cards are dealt. This action is performed by the house dealer.

cut card: A card used to determine the location of the cut.

cut card: 1. In poker, a blank card, usually of a different color than the current deck in play and usually the same solid color on both sides, placed at the bottom of the deck to prevent the bottom card from being flashed. 2. In California games, the deck (usually several decks) can be cut after the dealer has shuffled. This is done by sliding the cut card into the deck before inserting the deck into the shoe.

D

dead card: A card not eligible to continue in play. A card may be declared dead because it is inadvertently exposed while being dealt, found face up within the deck during a deal (boxed), accidentally dealt off the table, or for other reasons.

dead hand: A hand that is not eligible to continue in play. A hand may be declared dead (and thus ruled ineligible to win any bet or portion of a pot) because it is dropped on the floor, becomes mixed in with discards, or for other reasons.

deal: (verb) 1. Distribute cards (or tiles) to each player. This is done by the house dealer. — (noun) 2. See hand (definition 3).

dealer button: A disk that indicates, in poker, which player is in the nominal dealer position, and, in California games, which player is the player-dealer (that is, has the bank). Often shortened to button.

dealer position: The position (seat) of the dealer button.

dealing shoe: Shoe.

deal off: In poker, play each hand of the blind cycle, including the dealer position and then leave the table or change seats. Sometimes called play through the blinds. Compare with play to the blind.

deck: The 52 cards (53 if the joker is used) from which poker (and other card games) is played, consisting of four suits (clubs, diamonds, hearts, spades), each with 13 ranks (A or ace, 2 or deuce, 3 or trey, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, T or 10, J or jack, Q or queen, K or king).

designated player: Another name for player-dealer. Sometimes shortened to DP.

deuce: A 2 (the card).

discards: Cards that have been thrown by players and are taken out of play by the house dealer. Sometimes called the muck.

dominoes: The tiles that constitute player hands in pai gow tiles. There are 32 tiles.

double down: In 21st Century Blackjack, double one’s bet in exchange for one card dealt face down.

double-hand poker: Another name for pai gow poker.

downcards: In poker, those cards that belong to a player’s hand and are not revealed until the showdown . These are the first two cards in hold’em and the first four cards in Omaha.

DP: Designated player.

draw: Hit.

drop: A nominal amount that is taken per pot from each participant in poker games. Also known as rake.

early position: In a poker game, the first few positions to the left of the button, or to the left of the obligatory blinds. Compare with late position.

8-or-better: The qualifier (condition) in Omaha high-low split that to be eligible for the low half of the pot a hand must consist of five cards that rank 8 or lower, none of which is duplicated. (Straights and flushes do not count against a low hand.)

E

exposed card: A card that is accidentally turned up during play. Depending on circumstances, an exposed card can be declared a dead card.

extent that money covers: See bank covers.

F

face down: Said of cards, toward the table, that is, not visible; dealt in such a way that only the card backs are visible. This is how hole cards are dealt in hold’em (a player’s first two cards) and Omaha (a player’s first four cards) and how all player hands and some or all of the player-dealer’s cards are dealt in 21st Century Blackjack, 21st Century Baccarat, pai gow poker, and three-card poker.

face up: Said of cards, with their fronts (faces) visible. This is how the community cards are dealt in hold’em and Omaha and how some of the player-dealer’s cards are dealt in 21st Century Blackjack and three-card poker.

floor: The premises around the gaming tables, usually with reference to the employees working there or the games played. Bay 101 Casino has a poker floor and a California games floor. Often referred to as section, as in the poker section and the California games section.

floorperson: A Bay 101 Casino employee who seats players, brings new decks, keeps order, settles disputes, and sometimes sells chips to players.

flop: The first three community cards in hold’em or Omaha.

flush: 1. In poker, five cards (not in sequence) of the same suit. Ranks above a straight and below a full house. Example: A♥ 10♥ 7♥ 4♥ 2♥. Between two flushes, the one topped by the higher card or cards beats the other. For example, A♥ 10♥ 7♥ 4♥ 2♥ beats K♠ J♠ 9♠ 3♠ 2♠ and K♦ Q♦ J♦ 7♦ 4♦ beats K♣ Q♣ J♣ 6♣ 5♣. 2. In three-card poker, three cards (not in sequence) of the same suit. Example: K♣ 3♣ 2♣. As in poker, between two flushes, the one topped by the higher card or cards beats the other.

fold: Throw one’s cards in (face down towards the house dealer) and give up participation in the current pot (including any claim on the pot).

foul hand: A hand that is in dispute and requires a floorperson’s decision on whether the hand may continue to play.

four of a kind: A poker hand, four cards of the same rank, plus one other unrelated cards. Example: 9♣ 9♠ 9♦ 9♥ A♣. Ranks above a full house and below a straight flush. 2. In three-card poker, three cards of the same rank. Example: 8♥ 8♣ 8♦.

freezeout tournament: A tournament event that continues until one player has won all the chips.

front hand: In pai gow poker, the two-card hand, placed in front of the back hand after the player has set his hand, and which must rank lower than the back hand.

full action: See bank does not cover.

full buy-in: An amount equal to the posted minimum buy-in for a particular game.

full house: A poker hand, three cards of the same rank plus two cards of the same rank. Example: 9♣ 9♠ 9♦ A♣ A♥. Ranks above a flush and below four of a kind.

G

Gee Joon: The highest-ranking pai gow tiles combination, 2-4 with 1-2. Also known as The Supreme Pair.

Gong: In pai gow tiles, a 12 or a 2 tile with any 8.

H

half kill: 1. The next pot after a scoop pot in Omaha high-low split or seven-card stud high-low split. A half kill pot is played at 50 percent higher stakes than the customary limits. For example, a $4-$8 game becomes $6-$12 for one hand. 2. A description for such a game, as Omaha high-low split with a half kill.

hand: 1. In poker, the cards in possession of a player. In hold’em or Omaha, this is the first two or four cards the player initially receives. It also is the combination the player forms with his starting cards and as many of the community cards as are relevant. 2. In a California games, the cards or tiles in possession of a player or player-dealer. 3. In poker or a California game, the actual play of the cards (or tiles) at a table from the point of their first being dealt until the showdown. In this sense, sometimes also called deal.

hands: See rank of hands.

hard hand: In 21st Century Blackjack, a hand in which an ace is given a value of 1, as opposed to a soft hand. Examples: A♠ 5♥ 3♦ 8♠ 4♦ A♣ 8♦.

hard 17: In 21st Century Blackjack, a hand that totals 17 and that does not have an ace given a value of 11. Examples: K♠ 7♥ 8♠ 8♦ A♣.

heads up: 1. In poker, the point at which, during the play of a hand, only two players remain. A hand can start out heads up, or more than two players can participate and then all but two fold. 2. Describing a poker game played between just two players. 3. Describing the point at the end of a tournament when only two players remain.

high: In Omaha high-low split, a contender for high hand. Also, the holder of the best hand for high at the showdown.

high half: In Omaha high-low split, the best hand for high at the showdown.

high hand: 1. In pai gow tiles, the higher-ranking of the two-tile hands formed after the player has set his tiles. The other hand is the low hand. 2. In Omaha high-low split, a hand that contends for or actually wins the high half of the pot.

hit: In 21st Century Blackjack or 21st Century Baccarat, draw cards to a hand. The opposite of stand. Also called draw.

hold’em: A poker game in which players start with two hole cards, followed by a round of betting (preflop), three community cards called the flop are dealt to the center of the table, followed by another round of betting, another community card called the turn is dealt to the center of the table, followed by another round of betting, and a final community card called the river is dealt to the center of the table, followed by a final round of betting. At this point either: a showdown occurs, and either the best remaining hand, formed by players using the best five-card combination from among their two hole cards plus any three, four, or five of the community cards, wins the pot; or the only remaining hand wins the pot by default. The “official” name of this game is Texas hold’em.

hole card: 1. In hold’em, Omaha, and seven-card stud, a card dealt face down and hidden by a player until the showdown. 2. In California games, a card dealt face down to the player-dealer and hidden until all player’s have acted on their hands.

house: The management of a casino; those who control, oversee, and run the games.

house dealer: The cardroom employee who distributes cards (or tiles), keeps pots correct, and basically runs a game but does not actually participate in the game.

house way: 1. How a pai gow poker hand is set if a player declines to set the hand himself. The hand is set by the house dealer in a predetermined manner. 2. How a 21st Century Baccarat hand totaling 5 on the first two cards is played if a player declines to make a decision on whether to hit the hand. House way is to hit the hand.

I

idiot end: In hold’em, the low end of a straight, or a straight that can lose to a higher straight. This is a risky hand to hold or draw to, because someone can easily end up with a higher straight. If you have 5-6 in the hole, and the flop is 7-8-9, you have flopped the idiot end, and will lose to anyone starting with 10-J or 6-10. If a 10 comes, you lose to anyone with a jack.

J

K

kibitz: Watch someone play, or stand and watch a game, often from the rail. Sometimes this includes offering unwanted advice.

kibitzer: One who kibitzes (and often annoys the seated players). Compare with railbird.

kicker: 1. In hold’em, the unpaired card that goes with a player’s pair or three of a kind. Often, the rank of the kicker determines the winner of the pot. For example, if one player has A♣ K♥ and the second has K♠ Q♦, and the board is K♣ J♦ 7♠ 5♥ 2♦, the first wins; the pair of kings with an ace kicker beats the pair of kings with a queen kicker. 2. In hold’em, the unpaired card that accompanies a player’s higher hole card. For example, with A-Q, the queen is the kicker. 3. In hold’em or pai gow poker, the fifth card in a two pair hand. For example, in the hand Q♥ Q♠ J♦ J♣ K♥, the K♥ is the kicker. For all definitions, also known as side card.

kill pot: See half kill.

kill game: A game that features a half kill.

Kum-kum betting: More than one player placing a wager in the same betting circle. This is not permitted at Casino Bay 101 Casino.

L

late position: In a poker game, positions to the right of the button, that is, those that make their decisions after the first few players have acted. Late position is advantageous, because players get to see what the other players have done before they have to act, thus they have more information than those who act before they do. Compare with early position.

limit: 1. In California games, the maximum amount a player may bet in a betting square. 2. In poker, pertaining to limit betting. “This is a limit game.”

limit game: A game with limit betting, as opposed to a big-bet game.

limit betting: Limit betting in poker has two levels. The first two betting rounds are at one level; the second two betting rounds are at twice that level. For example, in a $10-$20 game, all bets in the first two rounds proceed in increments of $10. Thus an opening bet of $10 can be called — or raised to $20. A further raise would make the total $30. Bets in the second two rounds proceed in increments of $20. An opening bet of $20 can be called — or raised to $40. A further raise would make the total $60. Also called structured limit and sometimes shortened to limit.

limp: Open a pot (be the first to bet on the first round) for the minimum bet or call when such a bet has already been made.

little slick: In hold’em, ace-deuce as starting cards.

live blind: In poker, a blind that can be raised even when the opening bet is not a raise. For example, in a $3-$6 hold’em game, the player to the dealer’s left (the small blind) puts $3 in the pot before receiving his cards and the player to his left (the big blind) puts in $6. The first player to open often opens for $12, that is, by raising, but not always. If the pot is opened for $6 (see limp) and no one raises, when the action returns to the big blind, he has the option of raising, or just calling and closing the action (see close the action). A straddle is another type of live blind.

lock: Nuts.

low: In Omaha high-low split, a contender for low hand. Also, the holder of the best hand for low at the showdown.

low half: In Omaha high-low split, the best hand for low at the showdown.

low hand: 1. In pai gow tiles, the lower-ranking of the two-tile hands formed after the player has set his tiles. The other hand is the high hand. 2. In Omaha high-low split, a hand that contends for or actually wins the low half of the pot.

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